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Farmlands and Bubbling Springs trails are interconnected loops, each with their own unique features. Farmlands is mostly a wooded walk through a relatively immature softwood forest of white spruce and balsam fir. Along the trail you will notice an old road that once led to Charlottetown – one of the oldest roads on the Island. It’s an easy trail in the summer, suitable for walkers and cyclists.  In the winter the trails are not groomed, so the trail is more suitable for boot hikers and snowshoes.  Fat bikes can also tackle the trail but only after the trail has firmed up from snowshoe and boot traffic. Dogs are not permitted in the spring, summer and fall.

Bubbling Springs and Farmlands trails are interconnected loops, each with their own unique features. Bubbling Springs is mostly a wooded walk, but it passes by some “bubbling springs” that are active year round. The trail also has great views of a small lake that lies to the east of the trail.  It’s an easy trail in the summer, suitable for walkers and cyclists.  In the winter the trails are not groomed, so the trail is more suitable for boot hikers and snowshoes.  Fat bikes can also tackle the trail but only after the trail has firmed up from snowshoe and boot traffic. Dogs are not permitted in the spring, summer and fall.

Here’s what Parks Canada says about Greenwich…

“The site contains an extensive and fragile coastal dune system, wetlands and various natural habitats in which numerous rare plant species are found. Among the most spectacular natural characteristics to be protected at Greenwich are the unusually large and mobile parabolic dunes with their associated counter ridges or Gegenwälle. This phenomenon is very rare in North America.

Greenwich is also noted for its cultural and historic richness. Research at the site is ongoing, and evidence found thus far indicates a landscape that has changed drastically over time. Several archaeological digs conducted between 1983 and 2002 by the Canadian Museum of Civilization and Parks Canada have found traces left by the major cultures that have existed on Prince Edward Island over the past 10,000 years. These include early Aboriginal peoples, the Mi’kmaq, French and Acadian settlers, and Scottish, Irish, and English immigrants.”

What Parks doesn’t say is the walk around the point at Greenwich is lovely. It increases the length of the trail to 8km. You can not do this walk when the Piping Plovers are nesting in the summer.

This new 6km walking and cycling trail is located behind the ball diamond on the western outskirts of Cardigan.  The trail was built over the summer months by master trail builder Albert Flavell with support from Cycling PEI and Transportation Minister Steven Myers.  The trail is undulating, smooth and fast, with lots of twists and turns – mountain bikers love it, but it’s also fun to walk in the summer and winter months.  If you’re biking or walking in the spring or winter, please respect the need to keep the trail smooth and fast – no walking when the snow is soft or the trail is muddy!  The trail is suitable for snowshoes when the snow is deep, and the trail is being groomed by a SnowDog when conditions permit.  Thanks to Cycling PEI for taking the initiative to develop and maintain this trail!

There are two excellent vistas of Cardigan village and the Cardigan River – one near the beginning of the trail and one a little later on.  Enjoy this new biking and hiking trail on PEI!

 


Located in and around the property adjacent to Beach Grove home, this easy 3.5km trail extends through a softwood forest up to and beyond the Prince Edward Home and the Trans Canada Highway (Rte 2).  There are plans to eventually continue the trail to the Upton farmland across the highway and even to the Confederation Trail several kilometers north of Beach Grove.

The trail itself runs along the perimeter of the Beach Grove property.  There are spectacular views of Charlottetown harbour from the trail and numerous benches where you can stop and enjoy the view.  The provincial government has a forestry property on the east side of the trail and it’s possible to walk through a forest plantation on your way around the trail.

The Homestead Trail is one of the longest trails in Prince Edward Island National Park. The long loop is 10km and the short loop is 6km.  Both segments have spectacular views of New London Bay and sand dunes on the north side of the Bay.  The trail circles around a series of farm fields that included a farm homestead in years gone by.  In addition to the bay view and sand dunes there are several stream crossings and a couple of sturdy Parks Canada bridges. The trail surface is crushed gravel and the trail is wide enough for two people to walk side by side.  The trail is well signed and we’ll maintained (summer and fall only).


 


The Dunk River trail, which is maintained by the local watershed group, is a delightful 3.5 km (7 km return) stroll along the picturesque Dunk River, just north of Kinkora in central PEI.  The trail winds its way through several stands of 100-year old hemlock and yellow birch beside a fast moving river that feels more like it should be in Maine or New Brunswick than in PEI.

The river bank is steep in places, making walking the path a little tricky in the winter months. There were a number of sweepers lying across the river when we walked it – perhaps they’ll be gone after a good spring freshett!

 

This trail runs through a primarily softwood stand parallel to the Eastern Road.  The trail is on land owned by Parks Canada, but the trail is not maintained by Parks. The trail can be walked in conjunction with the Campbell’s Pond trail for a combined distance of approximately 7 km.


 


 

Location: 46°22’14.19″N  & 63°17’16.16″W

Civic Address: 46 Rackhams Lane, Wheatley River

Hours: Dawn till Dusk

Amenities: Picnic tables, dock for canoe launching, trails and apple trees!

Rackam’s Pond Trail is only used as a three season trail due to some sections being

very close to the water.

It is difficult to tell where the water is when trail is snow covered.